Digital Flashcards – What can you do with Quizlet?

Quizlet is a website that gives the students motivation to learn vocabulary – it is simply fun!

On quizlet, student creates sets of words and translations, or words and definitions. It is also possible for the teacher to create the sets for them. 

The sets of words are kept in every student/teacher account and they can practice any time – on the computer or the smartphone app. 

After a set of words is created, here are the practice options:

You can also search sets of words on any subject, save them as your own, edit and share them with your students. 

Another good feature is adding pictures. This is great for your visual learners. You can add a picture to any word and it will be presented on the flashcard. 

I use it for all the vocabulary we have in the textbooks. The kids search the meaning of the words in the glossary of the book, and insert it into the app to create flashcards. It gives them the option to review and practice the words by themselves.

What do you – or the students – do?

1. sign up to the website. 

2. Click on “create a set”. 

3. Choose the language for the term and for the definition. Quizlet does not read aloud Hebrew, but it recognizes it and will read aloud the English definition.

4. When you finish, name the set (the students can copy the name from the textbook), and click “create”. 

5. Now, a set is ready. the students can use the flashcards, practice with 3 different exercises and 2 games. The teacher can click on the test and print out a test for the students. 

Share a set – I usually ask one of the students to share the set with me. It then appears on my quizlet and of course the student feels great – they love to help 🙂

English definition – more skilled students can choose both term and definition in English. Quizlet suggest definitions and the students should choose the right one. 

Search – you can browse the many quizlet sets other teacher have prepared according to the subject you are going to teach. Once you find something interesting, you can save it and edit it for your purpose. 

Here are two online tutorials: 

Eva Earnst:

“secondary solutions blog”:

My students love it – Try it yourselves! 

Mobile & Active learning – Irregular Verbs Practice

Over the last few months I have been teaching the simple past, present perfect and the passive in several classes. I have looked for a way that students will learn and practice the irregular verbs in a fun way. The result is here and you may use it yourselves directly from the provided links.

 Quizlet Learn and Practice (There’s a complete post on quizlet here). 

In this public link, the students can learn the words in 4 different learning methods (flash cards, learn, speller and test) and practice using two games: space race and scatter. They don’t have to sign up in order to practice.

 Quizizz mobile quiz – 4 different quizes.

On Quizizz, every teacher or student can create an online quiz which is quite fun. There are also many public quizizz on many subjects that you can copy, edit or use (watch a youtube guide).

1. Click on the link to the quiz of your choice.

2. Click “play”.

3. Click “proceed”.

A code to the game will appear on your desktop.

The students, on their mobile devices or in the computer lab, enter the link Join.quizizz.com and enter the code.

Each student is tested in his own pace. I gave 30 seconds to each question but you can change it if you register and “duplicate” my quiz.

The quizizz are:

 

Silly, So What? – Online mini-games to practice the basics.

“Interactive Sites for education” is a really cool website, which offers games in many subjects, as shown in the picture below. 

Sometimes a picture is worth a 100 words…and so is a game! Things that take a lot of time explaining become very clear through a game. For example, take this lovely mini-game from the same website, in which a fairy flies and asks the player to capitalize the sentences. she also gives feedback and teaches the rules.

The website contains a lot of games, and although some may seem silly at first, they are fun (tried them with 8th graders) and help the students internalize the rules (of the game…and the language). 

Another website where you can find original language games is topmarks.co.uk. The games are divided according to ages and topics. Look at this unique example of a word order game: In the game, Trapped, you have to rescue a bunch of people trapped in a castle, by answering word order questions. The music is intense and the animation is trully inviting. There is also a similar game about punctuation and about nouns and adjectives. 

5.7.15 update:

An extremely cool interactive board game I found. Here is the version for the present simple. The learner has to choose between 3 settings: Pirates, crocodile and space riders. They all present the same questions but in a different setting.

The learners throw the virtual dice and are asked a question. If they don’t answer correctly, they are moved back to the previous spot. It’s fun.  Under the game, on the web page, you will find the choice of grammar topics. The site itself, eslgames+, has many additional games. 


So play away…